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  • A form of ownership of a property where on the death of one of the co-owners, the surviving co-owner(s) is (are) entitled to the whole ownership of the property.

  • A form of ownership of a property where on the death of one of the co-owners, the surviving co-owner(s) is (are) entitled to the whole ownership of the property.

  • The final decision made by the Employment Judge following the consideration of all evidence in the case.

  • A legal process whereby you remain man and wife, but separated. The advantage of this is that you can apply to the court for orders about financial matters if you cannot agree

  • The practical authority to deal with and make pronouncements on legal matters.

    The employment tribunal usually has “exclusive jurisdiction” in the sense that the ordinary courts will not have jurisdiction over the same matters.

    As a general rule employment tribunals have jurisdiction to deal with cases only if at least one respondent, normally the employer, resides or carries on business in England, Wales or Scotland or if the proceedings relate to employment performed in Britain.

  • A tribunal has a discretion to allow certain tasks, for example, to extend a time limit if they are convinced that it is “just and equitable” to do so.