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Employment (for employers)

Self-employed vs employed – a case study

Self-employed vs employed – a case study

A report published earlier this week from the IPPR thinktank has called Britain the “self-employment capital of western Europe” following figures which shows that the growth of self-employment in the UK has been the fastest of all western European counties over the past year.

In the past 13 years, the number of self-employed people has grown by more than 1.5million to 4.5million which accounts for 15% of the labour force.

What does this mean for the average Jane?

Whistleblowing on Coronation Street

Whistleblowing on Coronation Street

Move over Carla, there’s a new employment law shirker in town. Todd, the new business man on the block (didn’t he become a solicitor in London?) has been taken on at his brother’s building yard to help run the business. Part of his new role is to order in materials for building jobs. Todd, being the no-good-guy that he is, decided that he wanted to make a bit of money on the side and has bought materials which are unsuitable for the required use.

Obesity and employment law

Obesity and employment law

There is currently a Danish case – Kaltoft v The Municipality of Billund - in the European Court of Justice concerning obesity, and whether this can be classed as a disability. The ECJ referred the issue to the Advocate General for an opinion on the law before progressing with the claim.

Nearly one fifth of employees fail their probationary periods or have it extended

Nearly one fifth of employees fail their probationary periods or have it extended

Spring Personnel have recently carried out a study to see why employee’s are failing their probationary period. The results were:

62% = poor performance

50% = absence

38% = poor punctuality

12% = personality clashes

The study also found that 4/5 employers have in the past extended probationary periods showing that employers are being realistic and are aware that some people may need a bit longer to fit in. The evidence suggests that employer’s may be more understanding to the stress being on probation is to the employees.

The many questions on the effects of COVID-19 on employment law

The many questions on the effects of COVID-19 on employment law

Everyone has an enormous list of questions about employment law during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lay-off was rarely used and furlough was an unknown. 

With the employment situation happening so fast, we've compiled a list of questions you may be needing the answer to.

CORONAVIRUS: Advice for Employers and Employees

CORONAVIRUS: Advice for Employers and Employees

The spread of coronavirus (Covid-19) has understandably led to increased concerns and the risks posed to employers and their employees should not be ignored.  There are a number of steps which employers should consider to protect the health and safety of staff and of course employers have a duty under the Health & Safety at Work provisions to ensure the health, safety and

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Reintroduction of employment tribunal fees?

In a surprising announcement, the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) has confirmed that it may reintroduce fees for employment tribunal claims.  This would be a surprising U-turn by the government which was criticised for its tribunal fee structure which was introduced in 2013.  The fee structure was decl

Inheritance tax changes

The recent Budget saw the Chancellor announce reforms to Inheritance Tax rules which were widely expected following the Conservative Party’s General Election victory.  Currently, a married couple are able to access allowances of £325,000 each, which can be doubled up and applied as a single allow

Grandmother with Grandchild

The Prime Minister David Cameron has recently suggested that he would be “happy” to look at plans for so called “granny leave” giving working grandparents the right to take up to 18 weeks of shared paren