Unfair dismissal on the basis of whistleblowing

How much will you be entitled to?

Please fill in the form for an immediate calculation of the award an Employment Tribunal may make for an unfair dismissal on the basis of whistleblowing.

1 Calculate your basic award

Age at unfair dismissal on the basis of discrimination

Can only be used for ages 15 - 80 unless your job's retiring age is different - in which case please call .

Years service

Capped at most recent 20 years service

£

Gross weekly pay

Max of £464 p/week allowed from 06.04.14

£

2 Calculate Compensatory Award

£

Net weekly pay

Including all benefits, e.g. pension, car, insurance

Weeks without pay

Estimate how long it will take you to resume employment

£

3 Calculate your Final Award

£

You may also be entitled to up to £300 Loss of Employment Rights

4 Tell us more

Contact Us

Call us on 0113 320 5000 to speak to a specialist solicitor.

Compensation for unfair dismissal on the basis of discrimination

 In all discrimination claims you may be entitled to an award to compensate you for any injury to feelings suffered as a result of the discrimination. The level of any such compensation is at the discretion of the Employment Tribunal and therefore we are unable to provide you with a guide as to what you may be entitled to. Currently, there is no cap for the level of compensation that you can receive for injury to feelings.

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