Compensation for rape and sexual assault

What do I need to consider if I am making a compensation claim for rape?

There are many matters to consider when making a sexual assault claim under the CICA scheme. Are you psychologically ready to make a claim? Are you likely to be successful? Do you need help making a claim? If you do who’s best to help you?

Is there a timescale for claiming compensation for rape?

It is always easier to claim within the 2 year CICA time limit for compensation claims. So especially if you are nearing the 2 year anniversary of the assault, do speak to a trained professional. I can be contacted on 0113 320 5000, or email cica@winstonsolicitors.co.uk . If you are reading this and you are over the 2 year time limit, it is still worth contacting me, as there are specific reasons that the CICA permit for a delay in seeking compensation. The rules are complex, so it is best to obtain legal advice.

How long will my claim take?

Rape claims can often be dealt with quickly, once the CICA have confirmed you are eligible. As I am aware of the criteria they use to check eligibility, I should be able to give you an indication as to how long it will take. I have dealt with claims that have taken as little as 4 weeks from submission of claim to an award of compensation made. And of course for various reasons, claims can and do take much longer, but usually rape and sexual assault cases are dealt with surprisingly quickly by the CICA.

I’d like to make a claim, but my support worker or the police recommend I don’t claim until after the Court hearing.

These people are genuinely trying to help, but they do not understand the complex rules of the CICA scheme. The CICA do not accept late claims because you were waiting for the outcome of a Court Hearing. I have listened to so many victims of crime say this, and I have to tell them that is not an acceptable reason for the CICA to waive their 2 year time limit.

There is a lovely lady called Helen Newlove, whose husband Garry was murdered by a gang of youths on his doorstep, because he tried to stop them from vandalising his wife’s car. She has campaigned for years to change the rules of the CICA, and as a result became a Baroness, which entitles her to speak in the House of Lords. She is currently in talks with the government to see if the scheme can change. But for the time being we have to work with the ‘unfair’ rules of the current scheme.

What should I do next?

Obtain professional advice so you can make an informed decision about whether you are ready to claim compensation.

I am here to help you make that decision, using the knowledge I have built up over 20 years, and the daily knowledge I have as I help people every working day. I will always provide compassionate, impartial advice, so you can decide when and if to claim.

Please contact me on 0113 320 5000 or email me on cica@winstonsolicitors.co.uk.

Jonathan Winston – CICA Solicitor, helping victims of crime since 1995

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